Toxic Relationship: The Fraud at Hunters Point

  

Click here to read the report by the SF Weekly:

Not far from the radioactive soil of Hunters Point, city environmental engineer Amy Brownell sits stoically in a room full of people who want her fired.

Someone tells her she should protect herself from criminal prosecution and become a whistleblower against the San Francisco Department of Public Health. But in a large meeting space down the stairs of the Southeast Community Facility on an afternoon in August, she’s here to do the exact opposite: Assure everyone that their health is not in danger by living adjacent to the Hunters

Simi Valley residents protest city proposal to use groundwater over contamination concerns

  

Fox 11 reports:

Protesters gathered in Simi Valley Monday evening to speak out against a city proposal to use ground water as another source of drinking water, citing concerns about contamination.

In 1959, the Santa Susana field lab in the hills above Simi Valley experienced a partial nuclear meltdown. The former rocket testing facility released massive amounts of radioactive isotopes and dangerous chemicals.

It’s believed the area is still contaminated, and residents believe its to blame for a cluster of rare pediatric cancers.

Simi Valley Community Asks: Fresh water supply or pipe dream?

  

The Simi Valley Acorn reports:

A proposal to tap into Simi Valley’s groundwater basin as a source for drinking water drew angst and anger from residents who claim the water has been contaminated by runoff from the Santa Susana Field Lab.

About 30 people urged the City Council on Monday not to act on a study by Ventura County Waterworks District No. 8 that looks at using the basin as a future alternative potable resource.

EPA blasts Navy for plan to retest soil at former SF shipyard

  

Click here to read the SF Chronicle’s report.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has excoriated the Navy’s plan to retest part of the former Hunters Point Naval Shipyard for radioactivity as inadequate and unscientific, threatening to pursue a rare dispute process if changes aren’t made, according to letters obtained by The Chronicle.